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Category Archive for 'education'

I have written recently on how I think work will change in future. Production costs for goods and services will decline significantly as work is automated but there will be an enormous dislocation in the jobs market with millions of jobs being automated out of existence and other jobs will change as automated assistants are […]

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The end of a year often encourages thinking about the future. My reflections here, however, are not purely objective as my daughter is expecting her first child and our first grandchild in Spring 2017.  Assuming that we are not wiped out by runaway climate change or nuclear war, how will the world of work look for that […]

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As I have said in previous posts, I am convinced that the most pressing educational challenge for the 21st century is to develop effective and efficient ways of adult continuous education. Without these, we will consign an increasing number of our citizens to the ‘digital scrapheap’ as they are replaced by ever-more powerful digital technologies. […]

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I’ve written this post from a Scottish perspective and specifically discuss the digital skills shortage in Scotland. However, I think that the problem is much wider, government responses everywhere are equally unimaginative and that innovative approaches to continuous adult education are required across the world. It is generally accepted that there is a worldwide shortage […]

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Whatever happened to e-textbooks?

I wrote a series of posts in 2011 reflecting on the future of textbooks and how I thought they would evolve. I predicted that textbooks would not be supplanted by ‘free’ internet resources but that paper textbooks would disappear in favour of e-books. Almost 5 years on, how did I do? Well, textbooks have certainly […]

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I have been a subscriber to the IEEE’s Software magazine since it started in 1984. At one time, in my office, I had a 25 year unbroken run of issues on my shelf until, thank goodness, digital libraries meant that I could dispense with the paper copies. It was, and maybe still is, the most […]

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I have just completed a HEFCE survey about accreditation of degree courses by the British Computer Society (BCS) that has the aim of soliciting opinion about whether accreditation of courses can be used to enhance graduate employability.  The details of the survey are unimportant but what is certainly not addressed in the survey is whether or […]

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In my previous post on this topic, I hypothesised that one reason why there is a gender imbalance in science and engineering is that teenage girls see science as ‘uncool’ and so choose non-science subjects to study at school. It is harder for a 15 year old girl to reject the claim that ‘Only nerdy […]

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I’ve been thinking about the problems of correcting the gender balance in science and engineering for a while but I’ve been inspired to write this post now because of the recent controversial comments by Tim Hunt, an eminent bioscientist, about women in science. Google these if you haven’t heard of them. The only people who […]

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There’s a worldwide shortage of software engineers. The demands from the software, financial and engineering industries for software developers is so high that there are simply not enough students with the necessary skills graduating from universities. Therefore, in different countries there are various attempts being made to widen the field and to attract people from […]

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